Survey reveals defects: what are my options?

Survey reveals defects

I’ve just received my survey report and the survey reveals defects. What are my options?

1. If your survey reveals defects, the first thing to do is get quotations from contractors for the works.  Survey reports don’t generally include cost estimates because the actual costs can vary depending on whether any work is carried out in isolation or as part of a larger scheme.  Make sure that you are fully aware of the cost of all works before exchange of contracts.

2. For most works it is better to choose your own contractor rather than letting the vendor arrange to have the work done.  Most works can wait until after the purchase is complete.  If you appoint a contractor yourself then you can make sure the works are completed to your satisfaction.

3. If the survey reveals defects which are significant and not reflected in the asking price, you may wish to renegotiate the purchase price.  Renegotiation is usually done through the estate agent rather than directly with the vendor.  Remember that the vendor is under no obligation to reduce the price.  Any renegotiation will depend on how much the vendor can afford to reduce the price by.  In some cases the asking price may take into account the condition of the property and there may not be any scope for renegotiation.  Negotiation of the purchase price is a delicate balancing act and may not always go to plan.  If there are other buyers on the scene then the vendor may choose to sell to another buyer.  Similarly, a vendor may decide to take the property off the market if the likely selling price is less than anticipated.

4. You are not under any obligation to give a copy of the survey report to the vendor or even the estate agent.  They may ask for a copy but the decision is yours.  However, in some cases it may be helpful to give an extract to the estate agent to help negotiations.

5. If you find that the cost of the works is higher than your budget you may choose to withdraw and look for another property.  This is only usually an option before exchange of contracts and this is a good reason to instruct a surveyor early in the house buying process.

In the event that you withdraw from the sale then the cost of the survey is a small price to pay when compared to any unexpected expenditure you would have had if you hadn’t commissioned a survey.

 

buying and selling a house

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Is a Mortgage Valuation the same as a Survey?

A mortgage valuation is not a survey. It is not intended to inform a buyer of the condition of the property.

Is a mortgage valuation the same as a survey?

Many buyers who have had a valuation carried out for their mortgage are under the impression they have had a survey.  Many buyers ask the question “is a mortgage valuation the same as a survey?”  A mortgage valuation is not a survey.  It is not intended to inform a buyer of the condition of the property and some lenders do not release a copy to the purchaser.  The valuation is arranged by the mortgage company and may be carried out either by an in-house valuer, or a valuer on their panel.  The purpose of the valuation is to confirm to the mortgage lender the value of the property in the event that you default on the mortgage payments the lender needs to know that the property offers sufficient security for the loan.

For an average 3 bedroomed house the mortgage valuer is likely to spend no more than 20 to 30 minutes carrying out the inspection.  The valuer will not normally get into the roof space (head and shoulders inspection only) and will not usually lift back edges of carpets, open windows, run water down the drains, etc.   Part of this time will be spent measuring the property in order to calculate the rebuilding cost therefore the inspection itself will not be detailed.

In comparison, a surveyor carrying out a survey on the same property is likely to spend around 3 hours carrying out the inspection, although the actual time will obviously vary from one property to another.  The surveyor will normally carry out a detailed inspection of the roof space (if safe access is available), lift edges of carpets (where possible) to check the construction of the floors, open windows, run water down the drains (where possible) in addition to inspecting other parts of the property.

 

What Types of Property Require a Survey?

All properties require a survey, whether new, old or newly refurbished.

A survey is not only necessary to check whether a property has any defects, other items may be identified in the course of a survey which require further investigation or specific enquiries to be made by your solicitor.  Questions may include:

  • If there have been any recent alterations to the property have these been carried out with Local Authority approvals?
  • Are there any issues with trespass such as overhanging gutters or trees?
  • Are there any asbestos containing materials (ACMs) within the property? These are not always obvious and may be in the form of textured coatings to ceilings and/or walls, floor tiles, etc.
  • Has adequate fire protection been provided between the house and any attached/integral garage?
  • Are there any flying and/or submerged freeholds? These may affect your buildings insurance.
  • If you are purchasing a flat do you know whether there is adequate fire protection and means of escape?
  • Are there any trees which may be within the zone of influence of the building?
  • Are there any known issues in the area, such as subsidence, pitch fibre drains, etc?

The survey can either be carried out by the valuer at the same time as the mortgage valuation or you can instruct a surveyor of your choice to carry this out separately.  You are able to instruct a surveyor who you think is most suited to carry out the task, this may be someone who is recommended by a friend, family, solicitor or anyone else.     You are NOT under any obligation to have the survey carried out by the valuer who carries out the mortgage valuation.  See also how much does a survey cost? 

To find a Chartered Surveyor in your area visit:

http://www.ricsfirms.com/


 

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Obtaining a valuation when selling a house bought under the Help to Buy Scheme

Obtaining a valuation when selling a house bought under the help to buy scheme.

When selling a house bought under the help to buy scheme (or repaying the loan in part or in full), Target HCA have specific requirements, one of which is to obtain a valuation.

The valuation must be carried out by a Chartered Surveyor (FRICS or MRICS), must be independent to an estate agent and must be someone who is not known to you.

The Valuer must inspect the property internally and externally.  It is likely that the Valuer will also have questions to ask you such as whether the property is freehold or leasehold, the extent of the plot, whether there are any garages or parking spaces outside the plot, whether there are any shared drives/access ways, etc.  The Valuer will also need to confirm the agreed purchase price.

The Valuer will research sales of comparable properties, making adjustments for any differences in size, location, changes in market conditions, etc.

The Valuer will prepare a report which will include a description of the property and its location.  It will also include brief details of at least three comparable properties in the area which have sold (or are under offer).  The report will set out the Valuer’s opinion on the value of the property based on the inspection and comparables.

Target HCA place a time limit of 3 months on the Valuation, therefore many homeowners choose to wait and instruct the Valuation when a sale has been agreed, rather than when the property is first offered for sale.  If the sale of the house does not complete within the 3 month period then a further valuation will need to be obtained.  Target HCA will accept a Desktop Valuation by the original Valuer provided certain criteria are met.

For further information visit     http://www.myfirsthome.org.uk/

To find a suitably qualified Chartered Surveyor who carries out valuations in your area visit   www.rics.org/uk

See also our home page for further information on buying and selling a house.

Source:  Target HCA Customer Information Pack

 

buying and selling a house

 

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How much does a survey cost?

How much does a survey cost?

As a rough guide, the cost of a survey for most properties will fall within the range of £300 to £1,200, depending on type of property, type of survey, level of detail, experience of the surveyor, geographical location, whether a valuation and insurance rebuilding cost are included, etc.  For larger properties the fee could be anything upwards of this figure.  If a firm is VAT registered then VAT will be added to the surveyor’s fee and so you should check whether the fee quoted is inclusive or exclusive of VAT.

A house survey cost will vary depending on a number of factors including:

  1. Size of property.  Clearly, a house with more rooms will take longer to inspect and this will affect the survey cost.
  2. Age of the property.  Many older properties have been the subject of alterations and improvements, some of which may be detrimental to the property.  Alterations give the surveyor more issues to consider during the course if the survey.
  3. Type of property, eg, house, flat, maisonette.
  4. Complexity of the property, eg, whether there are any extensions, whether any alterations have been carried out, whether there are any flying or submerged freeholds, etc. Typically, a surveyor carrying out a survey will ask the vendor about any alterations and other works which they have carried out.  However, some surveyors may simply report that a client ‘s solicitor should make enquiries on such matters.
  5. How detailed the report will be.  Survey reports vary considerably.   A surveyor who prepares a detailed report will clearly need to take more notes and photographs than a surveyor who merely reports “satisfactory” “in need of repair”, etc.

 

Survey with valuation and/or insurance rebuilding cost

A survey cost can vary if any additional services are required such as a valuation figure and/or insurance rebuilding cost. This will clearly affect the time input and therefore the cost of the report.

 

Survey cost when carried out by the mortgage valuer at the same time as the valuation

If you are taking out a mortgage then there may be an option to have a survey carried out at the same time as the mortgage valuation.  The mortgage lender will choose who carries out the valuation but remember that it is you, the buyer, who chooses who carries out the survey as this will be carried out on your behalf.  While this may be a cost effective way of having a survey, some purchasers prefer to have the survey carried out by a surveyor who has been recommended to them, eg, by family, friends or their solicitor.

 

Surveys on flats

Some purchasers are surprised at the cost of a survey on a flat.  Flats vary significantly.  A flat may be small, with, say, four rooms, but if it forms part of a large building then it is likely that the Surveyor will need to inspect the external parts of the block, or possibly other blocks on the site.  The terms of the lease must be checked before the survey is carried out, and all areas which the flat owner is either wholly or partly responsible for must be inspected.  This may include roof coverings, roof spaces, walls, drives, parking spaces, walls, etc.  In some cases a survey on a flat will take longer than a survey on a small house, and this is likely to be reflected in the price of the survey.

 

Obtain quotations

You can find names of Chartered Surveyors in your area by contacting the RICS Find a Surveyor facility on ://www.ricsfirms.com/

It is a good idea to forward the sales details for the property to a small number of Surveyors to obtain quotations.  When you obtain quotations for surveys, ask for sample reports so that you can compare the level of detail in addition to the price.  Also, ask who will be carrying out the survey and check that you are happy with their level of experience.  Remember that price is not the only factor in choosing a surveyor.

 

 

 

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Do I need a survey on a buy to let property?

Do I need a survey on a buy to let property?

In some ways it is even more important to have a survey on a buy to let property than one you plan to live in yourself.  If you live in a property yourself you will note whether any maintenance works need attending to.  If a property is let then you will be relying on the tenant to inform you if any works need attending to.  If you employ the services of a letting agent, while they may carry out periodic checks they may not be aware of repairs being required unless the tenant informs them.  Some tenants will bring any necessary repairs to your attention but others may not.  It is not a risk worth taking.

When instructing a surveyor to carry out a survey on a buy to let property it is a good idea to let them know that you plan to let the property rather than live there yourself.  This can then be considered during the inspection.

A survey should reveal whether anything needs attending to before a tenant moves into the property.  In most cases it will be necessary to carry out a test on the electrical installation and to service any gas appliances, such as boilers and gas fires.

The survey report will also let you know if there are any other potential hazards including:

  1. Dangerous wiring.
  2. Low level glazing and/or large panes of glass which are not safety glass.
  3. Large opening windows without opening restrictors.
  4. Windows to upper floors which do not allow escape or rescue in the event of a fire.
  5. Large gaps to balustrades.
  6. Lack of a handrail to staircases.
  7. Lack of smoke detectors.
  8. Infilled/capped chimneys or flues. A tenant must be aware that any disused chimneys/flues should not be used.
  9. Loose tiles.
  10. Inadequate fire door (or lack of a fire door) between the dwelling and any integral garage.

And finally, don’t forget to forward a copy of the report to your solicitor and to arrange buildings insurance.

 

buying and selling a house

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What should I do after having a survey?

What should I do after having a survey?

There is plenty of information and advice about having a survey before buying a property, but not so much advice about what to do after having a survey.  Remember that the purpose of a house survey is to identify any defects.  Even if a property is in a good order it would be unusual for no defects to be noted.  Any minor items can be dealt with once you have purchased the property.  However, if a survey report reveals that extensive works and/or investigations are needed then some purchasers may be unclear about the best way forward.

Firstly, you should forward a copy of the report to your solicitor as there may be items which your solicitor may need to check such as:

  • Ownership and responsibility of boundaries.
  • Ownership and responsibility of drains.
  • Ownership and responsibility of any shared drives/access ways.

Typically, a purchaser should obtain quotes from builders before commitment to purchase (normally exchange of contracts).  By doing this, the purchaser will be able to decide whether or not to proceed with the purchase in full knowledge of the level of expenditure required.

In some cases, a vendor might offer to arrange for minor repairs to be carried out before the sale of the property.  However, for most works, if you plan to proceed with the purchase it is better to wait and have the work carried out after completion of the sale.  By choosing your own contractor you will be in control of the quality of work carried out.  However, you should still obtain quotation/s before exchange of contracts.

Sometimes further investigations will be required, eg, if a defect is suspected but cannot be confirmed within the scope of the survey.  Opening up may  be required (with the vendor’s consent) or a specialist (such as a drainage contractor, wall tie contractor, etc,) may need to attend.

If the survey report recommends further investigations which are disruptive the vendor might not be willing to have these undertaken.  For example, if ground floors need to be taken up to inspect floor timbers to check for dampness and/or rot then this may involve moving large amounts of furniture and may damage carpets.  If this is the case, it is better for a buyer to budget for the worst case scenario, such as removal of ground floors, replacement with a solid concrete floor, etc.  The investigations can then be carried out after the sale has completed.  If the works required are found to be less extensive then a saving will be made.

If the cost of repairs is found to be significant, you may choose to speak to the selling agent to check whether the vendor may renegotiate the sale price.  If the vendor is keen to sell the property and if their financial position allows them to reduce the price, either in part or in whole, then the estate agent will negotiate to agree on a selling price.  However, the vendor is under no obligation to reduce the price.  In some situations a vendor may not be in a position to reduce the price, particularly if the vendor has a high mortgage or needs to sell at or close to the asking price to be able to buy their next house.

Above all, after having a survey, read the report carefully and read it more than once.  Highlight any important parts, obtain prices for any works and carry out any further investigations (if possible) before exchange of contracts.

 

buying and selling a house

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What affects the value of a property? 

There are several factors which may affect the value of a property.    Firstly, a mortgage valuation must not be confused with an estate agent’s valuation.  An estate agent’s “valuation” is a suggested figure to market a property to try to get the best price for the vendor, while at the same time being realistically pitched to obtain interest from potential buyers.  This figure can be adjusted during the marketing process, depending upon the level of interest.  This article deals with mortgage valuations rather than estate agent’s valuations.

A valuation for a mortgage is prepared to advise a lender whether a particular property is suitable security for an advance. It is typically carried out by a Chartered Surveyor who has experience in valuing that type of property in that particular area.  A valuer will look at details of comparable properties, check their sale prices, consider how long they were on the market, and make allowances for any differences and any changes in the market.  The valuation figure is arrived at after careful consideration and the valuer carries a high level of responsibility.

Factors which affect the value of a property include:

1. Location – A house in a sought after suburb will have a higher value than an identical house in a less desirable part of town due to a higher level of demand.

2. Size – In many cases a house with more bedrooms and other accommodation will have a higher value than a smaller property.  However, most house buyers are aware that some areas of their town offer “better value for money” than others and therefore size is not the only factor to affect the value of a property.  Size needs to be considered alongside a number of other factors.

3. Neighbouring properties/adverse land use – If a house is situated next to or close to something which a typical purchaser would find undesirable, this is likely to have an effect value.  This may include a property which has not been maintained and is unsightly, a business which generates noise, smell, a large amount of traffic, etc.

4. Condition – A valuer will take into account the condition of the property and the approximate cost of improving.  However, remember that the inspection for a mortgage valuation is not a survey.

5. Tenure – Tenure can also affect the value of a property.  Freehold flats often have a lower value than equivalent leasehold flats.  Some mortgage lenders do not lend on freehold flats and this affects saleability, and in turn, value. Also, a property with a short lease or any other onerous restrictions is likely to be less saleable, and therefore have a lower value, than a property with a longer lease and no onerous restrictions.

6. Parking – Most households have a car, and many have more than one.  A property with ample parking will be more desirable than a comparable property with no parking, particularly if street parking is restricted (possibly with the exception of some prime city centre locations).

7. Alterations without consent – If a property has been significantly altered or extended without the required Planning or Building Regulation approval then in some circumstances this may affect value, particularly if works have been carried out recently and enforcement may be required.  Also, alterations carried out without the required consents may be substandard, and possibly dangerous, eg, where electrical wiring has not been carried out by a competent electrician, and this may affect the value of a property.

See also: What can I do if my house is down valued?

 

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What a survey report will tell you (and not tell you)

A survey report will tell you the condition of a property at the time of the inspection. It is not a guarantee that no other defects will occur during your ownership.

A survey report will provide you with sufficient information (after carrying out any further investigations, etc) for you to decide whether or not to proceed with the purchase, or, whether to renegotiate the purchase price as a result of the findings of the report. It will not specifically tell you whether you should buy the property or not.

A survey report will tell you whether there is any evidence of settlement or subsidence to a property. It will not tell you whether any movement will or will not occur in the future.

A survey report will tell you whether there any are defects to the visible parts of the property. It will not tell you the condition of any hidden areas. However, if there is a reason to suspect defects to hidden areas, (e.g., damp walls at low level and lack of ventilation to a sub-floor void may cause dampness, rot and/or woodworm to hidden floor timbers) then the report should point out the risk and recommend further investigations are carried out before you exchange contracts.

A survey report will tell you the visible condition of the service installations. It does not include a test of service installations such as the electrical installation, heating system, drainage installation, plumbing installation, alarm system, etc. However, the survey report will recommend whether such installations require testing by specialist contractors.

A survey report will tell you whether any materials or products were noted during the course of the survey which may contain asbestos.  However, this will not be an Asbestos Survey and will not include taking samples to test for asbestos content.  An Abestos Survey and any testing of samples would need to be carried out by a specialist asbestos company.

 

See also instructing a surveyor,     what type of survey do I need? How much does a survey cost? and what should I do after having a survey?


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What type of survey do I need?  Building Survey or Homebuyer Report 

What type of survey do you need before buying a house?  Surveys come with a variety of names such as Building Surveys, Structural Surveys, Homebuyer Reports, and Condition Reports.  Whatever the name, and whatever the type of survey you choose to have, you need to know that the contents of the report are going to give you the information you need to decide whether or not to proceed with your proposed purchase.

A survey isn’t only necessary to advise on the condition of the property and whether there are any defect.  The surveyor may also note issues which require input from your solicitor, or further enquiries or investigations.

Most house buyers would like to know the following:

  1. Are there any defects which need urgent attention?
  2. Are there any defects which require costly repairs which may exceed their budget?
  3. Are there any “unseen” items which are likely to require attention, e.g., wiring, drains, cavity wall ties?
  4. Are there any legal issues such as trespass, eg, overhanging gutters, overhanging eaves, trees, etc?
  5. Are there any factors which may affect buildings insurance such as a flying freehold?
  6. If any recent works have been carried out do they have Local Authority consents? This not only applies to extensions, but other works controlled under Building Regulations including formations of openings in walls, works to kitchens and bathrooms, works to service installations such as wiring and heating.
  7. Does the property contain asbestos? Asbestos can be found in many common materials in residential properties including textured coatings to walls or ceilings, floor tiles, sheet board materials, rainwater goods, some water tanks, man-made slates, etc.   The presence of asbestos containing materials is likely to increase the cost of any repair and alteration works if these need to be disturbed.
  8. Whether there are any known issues in the area such as subsidence, black ash mortar, pitch fibre drains, etc.

 

A mortgage valuation is not a survey

If you are taking out a mortgage on the property then be aware that the mortgage valuation is not a survey.  The purpose of the mortgage valuation is to confirm to the mortgage lender that the property offers sufficient security for the loan.  It is not intended to inform the buyer of the condition of the property and some mortgage lenders do not even pass a copy of the valuation to the applicant (the buyer).

For an average 3 bedroomed house a mortgage valuer is likely to spend around 20 to 30 minutes  carrying out the inspection, compared to around 3 hours for a survey (possibly more or less depending on the age and condition of the property).  For a mortgage valuation the valuer does not normally enter  into the roof space (head and shoulders inspection only) whereas for a survey the surveyor will carry out a detailed inspection of the roof space (subject to safe access being available).

Visit  http://www.rics.org/Global/RICS-HomeSurveys-a-valuation-is-not-survey-REVISED.pdf

The governing body for Chartered Surveyors is The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.  The RICS has produced information aimed at home buyers about the importance of getting a home survey.

View the following video entitled The Importance of Getting a Home Survey  https://youtu.be/LER9SPvdmRs

What type of survey should I have?

One of the most common types of survey is the RICS HomeBuyer Report.  This is a standardised report format suitable for most types of traditionally built property and is based on a visual inspection.  The Homebuyer Report will be carried out by a surveyor with one of the following qualifications – FRICS, MRICS or AssocRICS.

The Homebuyer Report was revised during 2016 and is now available either with or without a Market Value (Valuation) and an insurance rebuilding cost. The Homebuyer Report was previously only available with the Market Value and insurance rebuilding cost.

The Homebuyer Report includes a description of condition, colour coded condition ratings, comments on defects, advice on maintenance, an overall opinion and summary of condition ratings.  However, the Homebuyer Report does not include a detailed description of the construction of the building or detailed advice on specific defects.  It also excludes cost estimates for any repair works.

However, many Chartered Surveyors produce reports in their own format as an alternative to the Homebuyer Report, many of which offer more detailed information.  When you request a quotation for a survey ask what type of survey she they offer.  Also, ask for a sample report and the surveyor’s terms of engagement to make sure the service you choose meets your needs.  The inspections for some types of survey will be visual only, while others may be more detailed and include lifting a sample of floorboards to inspect the floor structure where this is possible without causing damage.

If you plan to carry out any alterations then inform the surveyor prior to the date of the survey so that these can be considered during the inspection.   For example,  if you plan to build an extension it is useful to know where the drain runs are located, also, if you plan to remove any walls you will need to know whether they are load bearing or not.

Decide whether you require any additional services to the basic survey, such as an insurance rebuilding cost or valuation, prior to instructing a surveyor.  There may be additional  costs if the surveyor has to return, for example to take measurements to calculate the rebuilding cost.

View the following video produced by the RICS entitled Choosing the Right Survey (for consumers)

https://youtu.be/9r92bTZYrvA  h https://youtu.be/9r92bTZYrvAttps://youtu.be/9r92bTZYrvA

The different types of RICS surveys are described in the following 13 page document entitled A Clear, Impartial Guide to Home Surveys

http://www.rics.org/Global/RICS-Home-Surveys.pdf

Choosing a surveyor

It is a good idea to ask friends, family or your solicitor for recommendations before instructing a surveyor.   Remember you do not have to have the survey carried out by the person who carries out the mortgage valuation, you are free to choose a surveyor of your choice.

Obtain quotations from Chartered Building Surveyors but remember that the level of detail within reports may vary and so choosing a surveyor is not solely down to cost.

The governing body for Chartered Surveyors is The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.  They hold a register of all Chartered Surveyors and their fields of practice.  To find a suitably qualified surveyor in your area visit RICS Find a Surveyor  http://www.ricsfirms.com/

Finally, whatever the name of the survey report, and whatever type of survey you decide to have, ensure the surveyor you instruct is local and experienced.  Also, ensure that the survey report will provide you with the information you require, in the detail you require.

See also What should I do after having a survey?

Source:  www.rics.org

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Buying a house with an extension: what to check – Local Authority approvals, substandard construction

When buying a house with an extension there are a number of issues to consider.

Local Authority Approvals – buying a house with an extension

The purpose of Building Regulations is to ensure that construction works are carried out to the required standard, are safe and have a satisfactory level of insulation.  If you are buying a house with an extension which does not have Building Regulation approval then its construction may be substandard or even dangerous.   It is possible that a lack of Building Regulation approval may affect the buildings insurance policy and/or mortgagability (and saleability) of the property.

If you plan to buy a house with an extension then you/your solicitor must make enquiries to establish whether the required Local Authority approvals have been obtained.  Obtain copies of all documentation and keep these with your other purchase documents.

However, you may find that the works were carried out without the required Local Authority approvals.  If this is the case then the Local Authority may choose to take enforcement action against the owner of the property (even if the works were carried out by a former owner).  In other words,  if you purchase a house with an extension which does not have the required Local Authority approvals then there is a risk that you will be required to rectify the works at your own expense.  The owner of the property may apply for retrospective approval, however, this may delay the sale of the property.  A speedier solution may be to take out an indemnity policy.  Your solicitor can advise on the suitability of an indemnity policy for your particular situation and can advise on the policy details and any limitations.

For further information on what works require Planning Permission, Building Control Approval and Listed Building Consent visit the Planning Portal using the link below:

https://www.planningportal.co.uk/

 

Half brick rear additions

Many older properties have additions (often at the rear) which are of half brick (single skin) construction.  Some were former outbuildings which have been incorporated into the living space.  This form of construction is substandard, may allow rain penetration, high heat loss and condensation.  If you are seeking a mortgage then it is possible that a retention may be made (or an undertaking to upgrade the walls) until works have been carried out to a satisfactory standard.

 

Lack of a cavity tray where conservatories and single storey extensions are provided

Where a single storey part is provided there is normally a cavity tray in the cavity wall immediately above the lower roof.  With cavity walls it is normal for rainwater to pass through the external leaf and into the cavity. A cavity tray is needed in this position to help water entering the cavity to pass to the outside instead of causing the inner face of the wall below to become damp.  In other words, if a cavity tray is not inserted into the cavity wall where a single storey extension or conservatory are added then there is a risk of dampness to the wall internally, ie, inside the house.

Damp patches may be noted to the wall or wall plaster in the area close to the new abutment to the outside wall.  If you are having a survey then your surveyor can check this area with a moisture meter.  A moisture meter can detect dampness which may not be visible to the naked eye.  If you are having only a mortgage valuation but no survey then the valuer may not check this area with a moisture meter.  See also – is a mortgage valuation the same as a survey?

If dampness is noted due to a lack of a cavity tray then it will be necessary to insert a cavity tray at this position.

 

Low pitched roofs to single storey extensions

Many people would prefer to have a pitched rood rather than a flat roof over an extension as they consider it will have a have a longer life and need less maintenance.  Also, many pitched roofs have a better appearance than flat roofs.  But many home owners do not consider the pitch of the roof and the type of tile.  In many cases the pitch is determined by the size of the extension and the position of any upper windows. In some cases there may only be sufficient height for a relatively low pitched roof.

Each type of tile has a minimum pitch for it to be watertight, ie, roofs below the minimum pitch for the type of tile may not be watertight.  For instance, Redland 50 Double Roman tiles should be used at minimum pitches of 17.5, 22.5 or 30 degrees depending on whether the tiles are through coloured or have a granular finish, and also depending on headlap.  Therefore, if a pitched roof has a low pitch it is possible that it may not be watertight unless a suitable type of tile has been used such as Forticrete Centurion which can be used for pitches as low as 10 or 12.5 degrees depending on headlap, lap of underlay, etc.

 

The list above is for general advice and is not exhaustive as further issues may require investigation and enquiries, depending on the property you propose to buy.

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