Renegotiating the purchase price of a property following a survey

Reasons for renegotiating the purchase price of a property

Renegotiating the purchase price of a property is an obvious thing to consider if your house survey reveals unexpected defects, particularly if they are going to be costly to repair.  Most purchasers would make an offer “subject to survey”, making it clear that firstly, they plan to have a survey, and secondly, if the survey reveals defects which they were not aware of they may consider revising their offer.   Visit the following:  https://www.gov.uk/buy-sell-your-home/offers

Renegotiating the purchase price of a property may also be necessary if you are seeking a mortgage and the mortgage valuation is less than the previously agreed purchase price.

 

How to renegotiate the purchase price

Renegotiating the purchase price of a property would typically be done through the estate agent.

After receiving the survey report, the buyer should obtain cost estimates from contractors for any recommended works prior to commitment to purchase.  The estimates can be used as a basis for negotiation.

It is important to remember that the seller is under no obligation to reduce the price, even if works are required.  Most sellers would have a minimum price for which they are prepared to sell their property.  This may be based on how much they need to repay a mortgage or how much they need to be able to buy their next home.  However, some purchasers may be in a position to agree a reduced price in order to achieve a sale.  The selling agent may know the vendor’s position and should be able to advise the buyer whether there is any room for negotiation.

Sometimes the selling agent or vendor will ask to see a copy of the survey report.  The survey report has been prepared for the buyer, and the buyer is under no obligation to provide this to anyone.  However, in some cases it may be helpful to show extracts of the report, along with quotations for the works, but this is entirely the buyer’s choice.

If the reason for renegotiating the purchase price is because the mortgage valuation is lower than the previously agreed purchase price then the purchaser may not be able to proceed with the purchase unless the price is lowered or the buyer has additional funds to put towards the purchase.

The success of negotiations will depend on a number of factors including the seller’s financial position, whether the seller needs to sell the property and whether there are any other potential purchasers on the scene who are in a position to proceed and are prepared to pay a higher price.

Remember that the seller does not have to reduce the price and may even decide to not sell the property if it does achieve  a particular selling price.  The success of any negotiation depends not only on the cost of any works but also on the individual circumstances of both the buyer and seller.

 

buying and selling a house

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Survey reveals defects: what are my options?

Survey reveals defects

I’ve just received my survey report and the survey reveals defects. What are my options?

1. If your survey reveals defects, the first thing to do is get quotations from contractors for the works.  Survey reports don’t generally include cost estimates because the actual costs can vary depending on whether any work is carried out in isolation or as part of a larger scheme.  Make sure that you are fully aware of the cost of all works before exchange of contracts.

2. For most works it is better to choose your own contractor rather than letting the vendor arrange to have the work done.  Most works can wait until after the purchase is complete.  If you appoint a contractor yourself then you can make sure the works are completed to your satisfaction.

3. If the survey reveals defects which are significant and not reflected in the asking price, you may wish to renegotiate the purchase price.  Renegotiation is usually done through the estate agent rather than directly with the vendor.  Remember that the vendor is under no obligation to reduce the price.  Any renegotiation will depend on how much the vendor can afford to reduce the price by.  In some cases the asking price may take into account the condition of the property and there may not be any scope for renegotiation.  Negotiation of the purchase price is a delicate balancing act and may not always go to plan.  If there are other buyers on the scene then the vendor may choose to sell to another buyer.  Similarly, a vendor may decide to take the property off the market if the likely selling price is less than anticipated.

4. You are not under any obligation to give a copy of the survey report to the vendor or even the estate agent.  They may ask for a copy but the decision is yours.  However, in some cases it may be helpful to give an extract to the estate agent to help negotiations.

5. If you find that the cost of the works is higher than your budget you may choose to withdraw and look for another property.  This is only usually an option before exchange of contracts and this is a good reason to instruct a surveyor early in the house buying process.

In the event that you withdraw from the sale then the cost of the survey is a small price to pay when compared to any unexpected expenditure you would have had if you hadn’t commissioned a survey.

 

buying and selling a house

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What a survey report will tell you (and not tell you)

A survey report will tell you the condition of a property at the time of the inspection. It is not a guarantee that no other defects will occur during your ownership.

A survey report will provide you with sufficient information (after carrying out any further investigations, etc) for you to decide whether or not to proceed with the purchase, or, whether to renegotiate the purchase price as a result of the findings of the report. It will not specifically tell you whether you should buy the property or not.

A survey report will tell you whether there is any evidence of settlement or subsidence to a property. It will not tell you whether any movement will or will not occur in the future.

A survey report will tell you whether there any are defects to the visible parts of the property. It will not tell you the condition of any hidden areas. However, if there is a reason to suspect defects to hidden areas, (e.g., damp walls at low level and lack of ventilation to a sub-floor void may cause dampness, rot and/or woodworm to hidden floor timbers) then the report should point out the risk and recommend further investigations are carried out before you exchange contracts.

A survey report will tell you the visible condition of the service installations. It does not include a test of service installations such as the electrical installation, heating system, drainage installation, plumbing installation, alarm system, etc. However, the survey report will recommend whether such installations require testing by specialist contractors.

A survey report will tell you whether any materials or products were noted during the course of the survey which may contain asbestos.  However, this will not be an Asbestos Survey and will not include taking samples to test for asbestos content.  An Abestos Survey and any testing of samples would need to be carried out by a specialist asbestos company.

 

See also instructing a surveyor,     what type of survey do I need? How much does a survey cost? and what should I do after having a survey?


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