Buying a property: websites not to miss

Most people buying a property will be familiar with websites such as Rightmove and Zoopla.  But much more information is needed before making a decision whether to buy a particular property or not.  How do you go about choosing a solicitor or surveyor?  How do you know whether there is asbestos in the property you plan to buy and what should you do about it?  What do you need to know if you are buying a property to let?  Where can you find information if the house you propose to buy is in a Conservation Area?  What should you do if bats are roosting in your new home?  How do you identify Japanese Knotweed?

General advice on buying and selling a house

Visit https://www.which.co.uk/money/mortgages-and-property/first-time-buyers/buying-a-home/how-to-buy-a-house-alm0r9l4yf5x  for general advice on the house buying process.  This site includes information on applying for a mortgage, making an offer, appointing a solicitor, arranging a survey, arranging insurance, exchanging contracts and more.

For further general advice visit also https://www.money.co.uk/guides/how-to-buy-a-house.htm

For advice on selling your home, including choosing between a local estate agent and an online estate agent, visit  http://www.rics.org/uk/knowledge/consumer-guides/selling-your-home/

 

Searching for a property and researching selling prices

Rightmove is a widely used website when buying a property.  It allows you to browse properties on the market and view photos and floor plans.  Rightmove also allows you to register for alerts for new properties coming onto the market in a chosen area.  There is also a facility under “House Prices” to check sold prices, which may be helpful for checking the selling prices of properties in your chosen area.  Rightmove has an App for phones and tablets and is useful for when you are on the go.  Visit  https://www.rightmove.co.uk/

Zoopla is an alternative site for searching for properties on the market and for checking sold prices.  It also includes statistics on property values and trends in a chosen area.  Visit  http://www.zoopla.co.uk/

If you are selling a property, don’t forget to check www.nethouseprices.com  for sold prices in your area.  If similar properties have sold recently it may indicate whether the asking price for your property is realistic.

 

Energy Performance Certificate (EPC)

Visit  https://www.gov.uk/buy-sell-your-home/energy-performance-certificates to find out which properties require an EPC and which properties are exempt.

Visit https://www.epcregister.com/searchAssessor.html to find a Domestic Energy Assessor to produce an EPC before marketing your property.

 

Appointing a Surveyor when buying a property

The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) has a search facility to find a surveyor.  The site enables you to enter a town or postcode and a surveying service, eg, Residential Surveys, Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs), RICS HomeBuyer Reports, etc.  To find a suitably qualified surveyor in your chosen area visit  https://www.ricsfirms.com/

For information on the benefits of having a survey when buying a property, and different types of surveys visit  http://www.rics.org/uk/knowledge/consumer-guides/home-surveys/

 

Choosing a Solicitor

For information on choosing a solicitor visit  https://www.which.co.uk/conveyancing/conveyancing-process/england-and-wales/find-a-solicitor/  This site provides information on solicitors and conveyancers, gives an indication of typical fees and has a list of FAQs.

 

Asbestos

Any house built or refurbished before 2000 has the possibility of having asbestos containing materials (ACMs).  For information on where asbestos containing materials can be found in a property visit  http://www.hse.gov.uk/asbestos/building.htm

If you are buying a property which contains asbestos containing materials visit  http://www.hse.gov.uk/asbestos/member-of-public.htm

 

Flooding

There has been an increased awareness of flooding in recent years.  For information on flood risk from rivers and sea, flood risk from surface water and flood risk from reservoirs visit

https://flood-warning-information.service.gov.uk/long-term-flood-risk/map

 

Bats

Many rural properties have bats.  If you are buying a property where bats are present visit http://www.bats.org.uk/  and http://www.bats.org.uk/data/files/BatsandBuildings_2012.pdf

 

Buy to Let

If you are buying a property to let then it is essential to visit https://www.gov.uk/private-renting/  for information on rights and responsibilities, tenancy deposits, houses in multiple occupation, etc.

For further information on becoming a landlord, appointing a letting agent, information on buy to let mortgages and insurance visit  https://www.which.co.uk/money/mortgages-and-property/buy-to-let

 

Conservation Areas and Listed Buildings

If you are buying a property in a Conservation Area or a property which is Listed, visit the Historic England website at  https://historicengland.org.uk/advice/your-home/owning-historic-property/conservation-area/

 

Japanese Knotweed

For information on  identification of Japanese Knotweed, prevention of spread, and disposal, visit:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/prevent-japanese-knotweed-from-spreading

 

Mobile phone coverage

https://www.which.co.uk/reviews/mobile-phone-providers/article/mobile-phone-coverage-map

Not something to be overlooked.  Use this link to check the mobile phone coverage map.  You can enter a particular location (town or postcode) although some areas have more results than others.  Many service providers also produce their own data.

 

Broadband speed

Don’t forget to check the estimated broadband speed for a property before you decide to buy.  Use this link to enter your postcode or location to check any measured download and upload speeds.  Again, some areas have more results than others. https://www.uswitch.com/broadband/speedtest/streetstats/

 

And of course, don’t forget to visit other informative posts on this site including:

Is a mortgage valuation the same as a survey?

Buy to let property:  choosing, managing, student lets and landlord’s responsibilities.

Instructing a surveyor when buying a house or flat. 

What should I do after having a survey?

Should I have a survey before selling my house?

 

 

 

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Renegotiating the purchase price of a property following a survey

Reasons for renegotiating the purchase price of a property

Renegotiating the purchase price of a property is an obvious thing to consider if your house survey reveals unexpected defects, particularly if they are going to be costly to repair.  Most purchasers would make an offer “subject to survey”, making it clear that firstly, they plan to have a survey, and secondly, if the survey reveals defects which they were not aware of they may consider revising their offer.   Visit the following:  https://www.gov.uk/buy-sell-your-home/offers

Renegotiating the purchase price of a property may also be necessary if you are seeking a mortgage and the mortgage valuation is less than the previously agreed purchase price.

 

How to renegotiate the purchase price

Renegotiating the purchase price of a property would typically be done through the estate agent.

After receiving the survey report, the buyer should obtain cost estimates from contractors for any recommended works prior to commitment to purchase.  The estimates can be used as a basis for negotiation.

It is important to remember that the seller is under no obligation to reduce the price, even if works are required.  Most sellers would have a minimum price for which they are prepared to sell their property.  This may be based on how much they need to repay a mortgage or how much they need to be able to buy their next home.  However, some purchasers may be in a position to agree a reduced price in order to achieve a sale.  The selling agent may know the vendor’s position and should be able to advise the buyer whether there is any room for negotiation.

Sometimes the selling agent or vendor will ask to see a copy of the survey report.  The survey report has been prepared for the buyer, and the buyer is under no obligation to provide this to anyone.  However, in some cases it may be helpful to show extracts of the report, along with quotations for the works, but this is entirely the buyer’s choice.

If the reason for renegotiating the purchase price is because the mortgage valuation is lower than the previously agreed purchase price then the purchaser may not be able to proceed with the purchase unless the price is lowered or the buyer has additional funds to put towards the purchase.

The success of negotiations will depend on a number of factors including the seller’s financial position, whether the seller needs to sell the property and whether there are any other potential purchasers on the scene who are in a position to proceed and are prepared to pay a higher price.

Remember that the seller does not have to reduce the price and may even decide to not sell the property if it does achieve  a particular selling price.  The success of any negotiation depends not only on the cost of any works but also on the individual circumstances of both the buyer and seller.

 

buying and selling a house

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Buying a cheap house – what to consider

If you are moving house and have found a cheap house, or one which is for sale for lower than you might expect, it is important to find out exactly why the vendor is prepared to sell for a low price.

When a property is marketed by an estate agent the asking price is pitched to generate interest from buyers but at the same time achieve the best price for the seller.

Many factors affect the value of a property, including size, location, condition, etc.  Some properties may seem cheaper than other similar properties for obvious reasons.  If you are buying what seems to be a cheap house, it is important to know why the seller is prepared to sell the property for a lower price than could otherwise be achieved.  Reasons could include:

  1. It may be in poor condition and require costly repairs.
  2. It may be poorly presented, eg dirty or smell of tobacco or pets.
  3. The vendor needs to achieve a quick sale.
  4. Lack of parking.
  5. It may be located on a busy road or have difficult access.
  6. The area may be less desirable.
  7. Neighbouring properties may be less desirable.
  8. Neighbouring land use may have an adverse effect, eg, business premises which may generate noise.

Less obvious reasons may include:

  1. A defect which you are not aware of.
  2. A short lease.
  3. Restrictions on use of the property, eg, agricultural tie or for occupation by elderly residents, etc.
  4. Planning proposals for neighbouring properties or land which may affect the property either adversely or due to uncertainty.
  5. Difficulty in obtaining house insurance on normal terms, possibly due to a previous claim, eg, flooding, subsidence, etc.
  6. Lack of Planning Permission for all or part of the property.
  7. Lack of NHBC or similar certificate for a new property.
  8. Presence of mine shafts on or near the plot.

The above lists give an idea of factors to consider when buying what seems to be cheap house, but are not exhaustive.

If you are planning to buy a house which is seems cheaper than you would have expected it to be it is important to find out the reason why so that you are in full knowledge of the property you are buying and the area it is in so that you can make an informed decision about the purchase.

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Should I have a survey before selling my house? 

Some people consider having a survey before selling their own property as they think it might ease the sale process and prevent delays.  The survey itself does not typically result in a delay in the house buying process so long as it is arranged in good time and not left until the last minute.

As long as the property you are selling is in a reasonable order, in most cases it shouldn’t be necessary to have a survey before selling your home.

When you have agreed an offer (or an offer “subject to survey”) your potential purchaser will choose whether or not to instruct a surveyor to carry out a survey (if your buyer is buying the property with a mortgage then a mortgage valuation may also be undertaken, either at the same time as the survey or separately).

Reasons not to have a survey before selling your property include:

  1. Most prudent purchasers would instruct a surveyor of their choice to carry out a survey on their behalf, irrespective of whether you have already had a survey carried out.
  2. If the buyer instructs a surveyor then the report will be prepared in their name and will be for them to rely on.  If the seller has commissioned a survey then this would not typically be able to be relied upon by a third party, such as a potential purchaser.  It may be possible to transfer the report into the name of the buyer but this may incur a fee.
  3. If the buyer has particular questions about the property, eg, if the buyer is considering carrying out alterations, these points can be addressed during the survey.
  4. If the seller arranges a survey before putting the house on the market and if there is a time lag between the survey being undertaken and finding a buyer, then the report may not be up to date.

In summary, wait to see whether your potential purchaser wishes to have a survey, and if so, leave them to instruct a surveyor of their choice.  Allow the surveyor access to your property and be helpful with any questions he or she may have.  So long as your buyer arranges a survey in good time the survey is unlikely to result in a delay.

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When should I arrange a survey?

The time to arrange a survey will fall somewhere within a band between agreeing an offer and exchanging contracts.  First of all, remember that a lender’s valuation for mortgage purposes is not a survey.

If your decision to purchase depends on the condition of the house or flat then it is a good idea to arrange a survey in the early stages.  This way, you can decide whether to proceed with the purchase at an early date and before your solicitor has completed their input.  Many house buyers initially make an offer “subject to survey”.  This way, the buyer makes it clear that the offer may be revised if the survey reveals that costly repairs are required.

A buyer who is relying on a mortgage to make the purchase should wait until the mortgage valuation has been carried out and have received a mortgage offer before instructing a surveyor (unless the valuation and survey are carried out at the same time, in which case the additional cost of the survey may be wasted if the property is valued lower than the purchase price and a mortgage offer is not received).

The most important date to consider before you should arrange a survey is the proposed date to exchange contracts.  Once contracts have been exchanged, a buyer is committed to the purchase and there may be financial consequences if the buyer pulls out after this stage.

Remember to allow sufficient time for the survey to be arranged, undertaken and the report completed before exchange of contracts.  Also, allow some time after receipt of the report to read the report carefully so that you are not rushed into making a decision.  Bear in mind that the report may make recommendations for further investigations or to obtain cost estimates prior to commitment to purchase, ie, prior to exchange of contracts, so that you are fully aware of any terms which may require significant expenditure.  And don’t forget to allow for busy periods and bank holidays, and check whether any parties, advisers, etc, have holidays or time off during the crucial period.

 

buying and selling a house

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Do I need a survey on a buy to let property?

Do I need a survey on a buy to let property?

In some ways it is even more important to have a survey on a buy to let property than one you plan to live in yourself.  If you live in a property yourself you will note whether any maintenance works need attending to.  If a property is let then you will be relying on the tenant to inform you if any works need attending to.  If you employ the services of a letting agent, while they may carry out periodic checks they may not be aware of repairs being required unless the tenant informs them.  Some tenants will bring any necessary repairs to your attention but others may not.  It is not a risk worth taking.

When instructing a surveyor to carry out a survey on a buy to let property it is a good idea to let them know that you plan to let the property rather than live there yourself.  This can then be considered during the inspection.

A survey should reveal whether anything needs attending to before a tenant moves into the property.  In most cases it will be necessary to carry out a test on the electrical installation and to service any gas appliances, such as boilers and gas fires.

The survey report will also let you know if there are any other potential hazards including:

  1. Dangerous wiring.
  2. Low level glazing and/or large panes of glass which are not safety glass.
  3. Large opening windows without opening restrictors.
  4. Windows to upper floors which do not allow escape or rescue in the event of a fire.
  5. Large gaps to balustrades.
  6. Lack of a handrail to staircases.
  7. Lack of smoke detectors.
  8. Infilled/capped chimneys or flues. A tenant must be aware that any disused chimneys/flues should not be used.
  9. Loose tiles.
  10. Inadequate fire door (or lack of a fire door) between the dwelling and any integral garage.

And finally, don’t forget to forward a copy of the report to your solicitor and to arrange buildings insurance.

 

buying and selling a house

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What should I do after having a survey?

What should I do after having a survey?

There is plenty of information and advice about having a survey before buying a property, but not so much advice about what to do after having a survey.  Remember that the purpose of a house survey is to identify any defects.  Even if a property is in a good order it would be unusual for no defects to be noted.  Any minor items can be dealt with once you have purchased the property.  However, if a survey report reveals that extensive works and/or investigations are needed then some purchasers may be unclear about the best way forward.

Firstly, you should forward a copy of the report to your solicitor as there may be items which your solicitor may need to check such as:

  • Ownership and responsibility of boundaries.
  • Ownership and responsibility of drains.
  • Ownership and responsibility of any shared drives/access ways.

Typically, a purchaser should obtain quotes from builders before commitment to purchase (normally exchange of contracts).  By doing this, the purchaser will be able to decide whether or not to proceed with the purchase in full knowledge of the level of expenditure required.

In some cases, a vendor might offer to arrange for minor repairs to be carried out before the sale of the property.  However, for most works, if you plan to proceed with the purchase it is better to wait and have the work carried out after completion of the sale.  By choosing your own contractor you will be in control of the quality of work carried out.  However, you should still obtain quotation/s before exchange of contracts.

Sometimes further investigations will be required, eg, if a defect is suspected but cannot be confirmed within the scope of the survey.  Opening up may  be required (with the vendor’s consent) or a specialist (such as a drainage contractor, wall tie contractor, etc,) may need to attend.

If the survey report recommends further investigations which are disruptive the vendor might not be willing to have these undertaken.  For example, if ground floors need to be taken up to inspect floor timbers to check for dampness and/or rot then this may involve moving large amounts of furniture and may damage carpets.  If this is the case, it is better for a buyer to budget for the worst case scenario, such as removal of ground floors, replacement with a solid concrete floor, etc.  The investigations can then be carried out after the sale has completed.  If the works required are found to be less extensive then a saving will be made.

If the cost of repairs is found to be significant, you may choose to speak to the selling agent to check whether the vendor may renegotiate the sale price.  If the vendor is keen to sell the property and if their financial position allows them to reduce the price, either in part or in whole, then the estate agent will negotiate to agree on a selling price.  However, the vendor is under no obligation to reduce the price.  In some situations a vendor may not be in a position to reduce the price, particularly if the vendor has a high mortgage or needs to sell at or close to the asking price to be able to buy their next house.

Above all, after having a survey, read the report carefully and read it more than once.  Highlight any important parts, obtain prices for any works and carry out any further investigations (if possible) before exchange of contracts.

 

buying and selling a house

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Moving house in autumn – heating, insulation and freezing pipework

When moving house in autumn there are a number of items which take priority over longer term plans.  Alterations, and sometimes even decorating, can wait until a convenient time, but first it is important to make sure your new house is prepared for the winter months ahead.

If you are moving house in autumn remember to:

  1. Check that the heating system is functioning and have the system serviced (unless this has been serviced recently). Ideally, ask the vendor to show you how to operate the system before completion takes place.  If the system has recently been serviced then ask for the documents.
  2. Check that any plumbing pipework and water tanks in the roof space are fully lagged to reduce the risk of freezing. The same applies to any pipework in unheated outbuildings and pipework to outdoor taps.
  3. Check whether cavity wall insulation has been installed if the house has cavity walls.  Cavity wall insulation can reduce heat loss and improve the level of comfort within a house, but note that not all properties with cavity walls are suitable for cavity wall insulation.  See also 1960’s houses:  common defects. 
  4. Check gutters, gullies and drains to make sure they have not become blocked by leaves, etc.
  5. Check any paved areas to ensure they are draining adequately and are not ponding. Any areas which pond may become slippery with algae and/or ice.
  6. Check the level of insulation within any roof spaces.  Don’t forget the roof spaces to extensions, bay windows, etc.  If insulation is insufficient, then topping up before the cold weather arrives should help improve the level of comfort within the house.

When moving house in autumn, a few simple checks should help to ensure that you are prepared for the colder, winter months ahead.  If you are unable to check the house for yourself, consider instructing a surveyor.

 

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Buying a refurbished house: what to check

Many people can see the attraction of buying a refurbished house as they can move straight in and unpack rather than spend weeks, months  or sometimes years getting the house the way they want it.  But can you be sure that any works have been carried out to an acceptable standard?  And more importantly, have the works been carried out legally?

 

New kitchen and bathroom

A brand new kitchen is perhaps a one of the most desirable things in a house.  Everything bright and shiny and with no stains to cupboards or worktops left behind by the previous owners.  When buying a refurbished house this may be one of the biggest attractions.  However, some works involved in refurbishing a kitchen and bathroom are controlled under Building Regulations for the purpose of ensuring that works are carried out to an acceptable standard.

Any works carried out to waste pipework are controlled under Approved Document H of the Building Regulations.  Minor works would often be carried out on a Building Notice.  The building contractor would submit a Building Notice to the Local Authority Building Control Department and the Building Control Officer would inspect the work at the appropriate time to check that the works meet the required standard.  Obtain all documentation for any works controlled under Building Regulations.

Don’t forget the things you can’t see.  Everything may look new, but if you are buying an older house do you know whether the incoming water main has been replaced?  Check whether there is any remaining lead supply pipework.  If the cold water supply pipe is lead then this will require replacement.  If this involves disturbing floors, kitchen fittings, etc then this will add to the cost of this work.

 

New windows and doors

The replacement of most windows and doors is controlled under Building Regulations.  The purpose of this is to reduce energy loss.  The FENSA scheme was set up to allow registered companies to self-certify the installation of windows or doors.  This saves time and makes it easier for home owners to replace windows or doors without having to apply to the Local Authority for Building Regulation approval.

Any glazing installed from April 2002 onwards (except new buildings) requires a FENSA certificate to confirm that the windows or doors comply with Building Regulations.  However, if any glazing has been carried out by a company which is not registered with FENSA , or carried out in a DIY manner, then the homeowner will be responsible for applying to the Local Authority to obtain Building Regulation approval.  Sometimes the installer may apply for approval on the homeowner’s behalf but obtaining approval is still the responsibility of the homeowner.

 

PVCu fascias and soffits

New PVCu fascias and soffits save the time and cost of redecorating timber eaves joinery and are another attraction of buying a refurbished house.  However, the new PVCu eaves joinery is often clad over the original fascias and soffits, with the original eaves joinery being left in place.  Depending on the age of the property it is possible that some of the original eaves joinery was asbestos cement (commonly used for soffits).  If there any asbestos containing materials remain then it is important to be aware of their location and condition.

Asbestos cement typically does not pose a problem if it is in good condition and not disturbed.  Ask the vendor if they are aware of any concealed asbestos containing materials (including asbestos cement eaves joinery).

 

Cavity wall insulation

The provision of cavity wall insulation is also controlled under Building Regulations.  CIGA (The Cavity Insulation Guarantee Agency) was set up in 1995.  It is an independent body which operates and administers a Cavity Wall Insulation Self Certification scheme (CWISC) in association with the British Board of Agrément.  A CIGA registered installer will assess the property prior to installation, carry out the installation and will apply to CIGA for a guarantee on behalf of the homeowner.

This guarantee is transferable to future owners of the property.  Also, if the cavity wall insulation has been installed by a CIGA registered installer then the installation will comply with the requirements of Building Regulations.

If the work has not been carried out by a CIGA registered installer then the work may not comply with Building Regulation requirements.

 

Additional loft insulation

Improvements to insulation in the loft will help to reduce heat loss and energy consumption.  However, if insulation is provided at ceiling level (to form a “cold roof”) it is important to ensure that the roof space above is adequately ventilated.  This is often achieved by vents in the soffits and/or tile ventilators.  If insulation has been increased, make sure that the insulation does not block any ventilation openings at the eaves.  This can be done by going into the roof space to check whether there is air movement and by checking that ventilation openings are not obstructed.

 

Laminated flooring

New laminated flooring looks clean and does not have the disadvantages of carpets which have been in use for many years.  However, it is important to know they are not covering defective floors, otherwise they may need to be taken up.

When buying a refurbished house look for signs that might indicate that timber floors may be damp, rotten or have woodworm:

  • Check each floor for springiness which may indicate rot, woodworm or inadequate floor structures.
  • Walk around the outside of the house to check for high ground levels. Ideally, external ground levels should be 150 mm (6″) below the damp proof course.  If the external walls are damp the ground floor timbers may also be damp, rotten and/or have woodworm.
  • Check that vents are provided at regular intervals to the external walls at low level to ventilate the sub-floor void. If the void below a timber ground floor does not have sufficient ventilation then this may lead to rot and/or woodworm.

 

Electrical work

Most electrical works are controlled under Approved Document P of the Building Regulations.  This can be achieved by employing an electrician registered with one of the government approved schemes who can self-certify any works.  Obtain the Building Compliance Certificate/Part P Certificate to confirm any electrical works have been carried out to the required standard.

 

New central heating

If gas fired central heating has recently been installed, check whether this was carried out by a Gas Safe contractor and obtain any documentation.

 

Recently redecorated rooms

Moving into a house which has recently been decorated through sounds perfect.  But when buying a refurbished house, can you be sure that new decorations are not hiding defects such as cracks?  Look for other signs of movement such as sloping floors, racked doorways, cracking externally, bowing walls, etc.

 

Generally

Above all, don’t get carried away by the newness if the interior.  Remember to check that the house as a whole has been maintained.  There is little point having smart and newly decorated rooms if the roof leaks or if the wiring needs to be replaced.  If in doubt, instruct a surveyor to make sure that there are no major defects.

 


 

 

 

 

 

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Buying a house in Spring: what to look for

Spring usually sees a surge in properties on the market.  This is a time when gardens will be at their most attractive with an array of flowers and new vegetation in contrast to the preceding months.  Also, many families who are relocating hope to complete their move in time for their children to start their new schools in September.  When buying a house in Spring don’t get carried away.  Its important to stop and think about what sort of home your proposed purchase will make at other times of the year.

 

Rainwater gutters and downpipes

If there hasn’t been very much rain for some time it might not be obvious whether the rainwater gutters, downpipes, gullies and hoppers are functioning.  When buying a house in Spring, it is a good idea to check joints of gutters and downpipes for signs of leakage such as staining and make sure rainwater hoppers are not blocked.  Also, check that gutters are adequately supported with brackets at regular intervals and check that all gutters have stop ends.  Examine walls carefully for any signs that rainwater goods have been leaking or overflowing.

 

Drives and paving

Drives and paved areas may look fine during a dry spell but it is important to look for clues to determine whether they are adequate during wet weather.

Check for signs of ponding to low areas such as stained areas or silt.  Puddles on the drive or patio are not ideal and can be a hazard when they freeze in cold weather.  Areas of ponding can also cause the surface to deteriorate more quickly, particularly after sub zero temperatures.

If the drive (and any other hardstanding areas) are steeply sloping then look to see where rainwater will run.  If paved areas slope towards the building then there may be a torrent of water during heavy rainfall.  Rainwater should ideally fall towards gullies or drainage channels and be discharged into surface water drains or to a soakaway.

 

Gardens

When buying a house in Spring, remember to check there are sufficient paths to access important areas of the garden such as the garage, sheds, bin store and the washing line.  Some external areas may be acceptable during dry weather but may turn to mud in wet weather.  You may not mind walking across the lawn to a shed or bin store in the spring or summer when the ground is dry, but the same route could quickly become a quagmire during wet weather.

 

Natural light

On a bright day in spring or summer rooms can look much brighter than on a dull day in the autumn or winter.  When buying a house in Spring, consider the size, location and orientation of windows to assess how much natural light the same rooms are likely to have during the winter months.  If certain rooms are likely to need lamps during the day it is better to know before you decide to buy the house.

See also instructing a surveyor when buying a house.

 

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